About Keith Morris

A Wreningham handbook with useful information for village residents has been published by Wreningham Parish Council and a printed copy distributed to all households within the parish.

The 16-page booklet contains information on village history, local government, places of worship, village amenities, clubs and societies and regular events.

There is also information on waste collections, library facilities, education, public transport, sources of information, health and other useful contacts.

The publication was edited by parish councillor Keith Morris, whom you can contact with any amendments or other information you think might be useful for a future edition. Also if you did not receive a copy and would like one, please send your name, contact details and address to: keith.morris@networknorwich.co.uk

You can download a PDF version of the Wreningham Handbook below.


An updated welcome booklet for new residents to Wreningham has been published online, providing useful information and a warm welcome to village life.

Written by parish councillor Keith Morris, the updated Welcome Pack contains information about village history, local government, faith, village hall, regular events, clubs and societies, facilities, education, media, public transport, health and useful contacts.

If you spot anything which is incorrect, or anything you think should be added, please email keith.morris@networknorwich.co.uk

Download  the booklet by clicking here

The packs are delivered to new village residents but are also available to existing residents. If you are new to Wreningham and have not received one, please contact council chairman, Michael Hill at wrendriff@gmail.com


Great recycling news for Wreningham as thanks to resident Val Keel there is now a drop off point for (normally) impossible to recycle plastic – particularly pet food packaging, baby food packaging, biscuit wrappers and crisp/snack packets.

The recycling costs are being met by manufacturers so there is no cost to users. The scheme is operated by TerraCycle which awards points for items sent to them; these are converted into money which is then donated to a nominated charity. In this case, that is PACT Animal Shelter. The more items collected, the more funding PACT will receive. Recycling

The items collected are: pet food packaging from cat or dog food or treats; biscuits, crackers and cake bar packaging; crisps and other snack packets; baby food pouches and snacks. Please make sure everything is clean and dry, especially the pet food pouches.

“I’m happy to take other types of printed packaging too such as coffee bags, sauce sachets, chocolate bags (basically anything with a silver lining) so if you want to include it, I’ll check whether I can do anything with it,” says Val.

“In addition, I’m happy to take any stretchy plastic/polythene such as bubble wrap, magazine mailers, bread bags, toilet roll outers, carrier bags and mailing bags – just cut off any paper labels first. You probably realise these items can go in supermarket carrier bag bins so you can take them there yourselves but if it’s easier to drop them off with everything else, I’ll do it.

“The thing you have to be careful about is that the plastic needs to have stretch in it. If it is noisy when crinkled and doesn’t stretch, it can’t be recycled, don’t pass it on to me, please put it in your normal waste bin.

“Just drop off the items (clean and dry) in the bin at Atherstone House, Wymondham Rd, Wreningham (24/7) and I will do the rest. Please spread the word; talk to friends, family, neighbours, people at work, school, church or groups you might be a part of and let them know I will take their items and pass them on so they don’t add to landfill or worse, the rivers, lakes or seas.

“If in doubt as to whether an item is acceptable, put it in the bin anyway, I’ll sort it out. If you have any questions, feel free to knock on my door or call 01508 488231,” says Val.

Don’t forget, Wreningham School also collects stationery items under a different TerraCycle scheme.

https://www.terracycle.com/en-GB/


The Centenary anniversary of the end of World War One has been marked in Wreningham with a service of Remembrance, a wreath laying, the installation of a soldier’s silhouette and the ringing of the Church bells to remind people of the sacrifices made.

The service of Remembrance at All Saints’ Church on Sunday November 11 was lead by Canon Martin Smith. The names of the war dead from the various parishes within the Benefice were read out by representatives of the community. A two minute silence was held by the 40 people attending. Canon Smith’s sermon on the necessity of Remembrance drew on his many years’ experience as a priest and RAF padre. The collection for the British Legion amounted to £121.

Immediately after the service the congregation was led from the Church to the war memorial in the graveyard beside Church Road by Michael Hill, chairman of Wreningham Parish Council. There, when everyone had gathered around, Canon Smith recited a prayer, Michael laid a wreath on behalf of the villagers of Wreningham, and all stood in silence for a few moments of contemplation.

All Saints’ Church bells were rung for five minutes from 12.30pm, as Big Ben in London stuck 11, at the start of the international bell-ringing to mark the Armistice.

Another reminder of the sacrifices made during past conflicts is the black silhouette of a soldier which has been erected on the Reading Room grass area by the village sign in the centre of the village.

The war memorial has recently been cleaned and restored thanks to a grant from Wreningham Parish Council.

 


A Wreningham village history group is set to hold its first meeting on November 7 at the village hall and anyone interested is welcome to attend.

Called Wreningham Past and Present, organiser Jean Lambourne said: “We want to draw together as many old sources about Wreningham village life from times past as we can.  Since my initial request for interest, there has been a significant response from villagers wanting to join in.  You can be any age to get involved.

“We have a plan. It’s not a rigid plan – we’re open to shaping it up to suit the interests or skill sets of those who want to help. All are welcome to come along and you might be surprised at what you learn.”

The first meeting will be held on Wednesday November 7, 7pm in the Margaret Preston Room at the Village Hall.

Pictured above are schoolchildren in Wymondham Road, Wreningham, in 1910.


The Anglican Upper Tas Valley Benefice, which includes Wreningham, has a new priest-in-charge with the installation of Rev Lydia Avery, who has moved with husband Chris from Somerset to take on the role.

Over 130 people attended a service at Tacolneston church on September 13, when the Rt Rev Dr Alan Winton, Bishop of Thetford, licensed Lydia and the Ven Steven Betts, the Archdeacon of Norfolk, installed her into the full-time role.

Upper Tas Valley Benefice Administrator, Christine Minns, said: “Friends and family of Chris and Lydia travelled from Somerset, Oxford and Suffolk to join with us in celebrating the start of this new phase in our church life and in Lydia’s ministry.  It was good that we were able to share this service with so many local clergy, many of whom have helped us during the interregnum.”

The schools, district and parish councils and the community at large all turned out to support Lydia at the service, which was followed by a buffet.

Lydia said: “Chris and I are absolutely delighted to be here, and to have seen the last of our packing cases!  We have moved from the Mendip Hills in North Somerset where we lived for about 34 years but felt that we were being called into a new challenge away from the West Country. So we’ve swapped one beautiful part of the world for another beautiful place.

“We’ve been completely bowled over by the friendly welcome we’ve received, and are looking forward to getting to know everyone well over the coming five years.

“During this time, I hope that we’ll worship and work together to serve our Lord, in whatever way He has planned for us. In particular, I hope to see the church-school and church-community relationships develop and grow even stronger.”


Wreningham’s former red phone box has been transformed into a village Swap Box facility for exchanging books and DVDs, complete with a stunning mosaic floor, thanks to the parish council and a group of residents.

The phone box on Ashwellthorpe Road near the school was bought for £1 from BT last year by Wreningham Parish Council and villagers were asked what they wanted it turned into.

A free library was the most popular answer and Cllr Keith Morris gathered together a group of interested residents to put the plan into action.

Hughie Glaves and Noel Course used their expertise to renovate and repaint the box and install new glass and signs. David Minns helped to straighten up the box and improve the surrounding landscaping. Andrew Moore built new shelves and the finishing touch was a stylish mosaic floor, depicting a wren, reflecting the story of how the village got its name, expertly created by Jo Billham.

The project was backed and paid for by Wreningham Parish Council and it was officially opened on September 7 and is in full use.

Residents are welcome to take books and DVDs for free and leave others in their place. Please use the facility considerately.

A light is installed in the box so it can be used at any time.

If you have any queries about the facility or ideas for its use, please email Keith at keith.morris@networknorwich.co.uk

Pictured above are Jo Billham, Keith Morris and Andrew Moore with the new Swap Box in Wreningham.


The Wreningham Community Archaeology Project got underway last night (August 7) with the digging of a test pit on the village playing field, led by local archaeologist Steve Hickling.

Old bricks fragments, pantiles, an iron nail and a fossil were among the items uncovered during the short dig.

A number of villagers took part in the digging and sifting training for the main event which is this coming Saturday, August 11, and it is still not too late for anyone to take part.

Villagers are invited to dig a 1m square pit in their garden, sift the soil layer by layer and pick out anything of interest for experts who will be on hand in the village hall to identify finds. You will then get a fascinating insight into the history of your house and land. Pits will be filled in afterwards.

The weekend will start at 10am when everyone will gather at the Village Hall for instructions and anyone who is interested in digging a pit or simply lending a hand (the more the merrier) to those who have already volunteered their gardens.

All the information gathered will be looked at by experts and form part of an official archaeological report. Becky Sillwood, a freelance finds (artefacts) expert will be on hand in the village hall on Saturday if anyone wants to show her anything they have found for identification.

There will be a barbecue for participants from 6pm onwards at the Village Hall social club, so please bring something to barbecue, and the bar will hopefully be open.

If you are interested you can simply turn up at 10am but if possible please contact steve.hickling@norfolk.gov.uk beforehand.

The Step-by-Step guide to digging an archaeological pit is here:
ACA field academy handbook 2011 final
and the test pit record booklet is here:
ACA test pit record b&w 2014

Pictured above are villagers during the test pit dig on Wreningham playing field last night.


Wreningham has paid a special tribute to a well-loved local postman – Pat Maidment – with a community meal and his own special postbox erected at the village hall.

Known, of course, as Postman Pat, he lived in the village for over 30 with wife Jill. Pat worked for the Post Office his whole career from the age of 16, until he died last March, aged 60, from a brain tumour.

After a community Sunday lunch in the village hall on March 4, around 40 family and friends gathered together outside the hall to watch Pat’s brother Mark unveil the special black postbox, which had been erected on the wall of the hall by some of Pat’s many friends in the village.

Friend Trevor Wadlow said: “There was a strong feeling in the village that we wanted to do something to recognise what a truly memorable and well-loved character Pat was and a postbox seemed a fitting tribute. We hope it will help preserve fond memories of Pat for us all for many years to come.”

Pat and Jill moved to Wreningham in 1986 and Jill said Pat worked for the Post Office since he left school at the age of 16. He started as a messenger boy and then became a postman, based at Thorpe Road in Norwich.

Commenting on the tribute, Jill said: “It means a lot to me and the family. I knew he had a lot of friends in the village, but it is great to know that so many people genuinely liked and thought well of him. It is comforting to know he is well thought of and people still think of him now. A postbox is an entirely appropriate memorial.”

Pictured above are Pat Maidment’s wife Jill, brother Mark and other close family members with the new postbox erected in his memory at Wreningham Village Hall. Picture by Michael Hill.


A welcome pack for new residents to Wreningham has been published in print and online, providing useful information and a warm welcome to village life.

Written by parish councillor Keith Morris, the Welcome Pack contains information about village history, local government, faith, village hall, regular events, clubs and societies, facilities, education, media, public transport, health and useful contacts.

Download  the booklet by clicking here

The packs are being delivered to new village residents. If you are new to Wreningham and have not received one, please contact council chairman, Michael Hill at wrendriff@gmail.com